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Maximizing services for juvenile justice "crossover caseload"

CJCJ's article, "Maximizing Mental Health Services for Justice-Involved Youth Using Diverse Funding," authored by Emily Luhrs and Selena Teji, was recently published in the Jan/Feb edition of the Offender Programs Report.  The Offender Programs Report  is a national journal for practitioners that is "devoted exclusively to innovative programs, management strategies and legal developments in offender rehabilitation."  

The article highlights two of CJCJ's model juvenile justice programs, Community Options for Youth (COY) and Wraparound (WRAP), to provide an example to other jurisdictions on how to effectively serve justice-involved youth with mental health needs in the age of state budget crises.  It outlines two under-utilized funding streams; Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) and Wraparound, that counties can seek-out in order to provide a comprehensive continuum of care for this population, known as the "crossover caseload."  The population of crossover youth in juvenile detention facilities is disproportionately high nationwide, and as states across the nation embark on or continue to reform their juvenile justice systems, CJCJ's COY and WRAP programs can serve as models for jurisdictions on how to take advantage of diverse federal and state funds to enhance their provision of appropriate community-based clinical and re-entry services.

The full article is available through subscription to the Offender Programs Report:

"Maximizing Mental Health Services for Justice-Involved Youth Using Diverse Funding"; by Emily Luhrs and Selena Teji: Offender Programs Report  15:5, 65, 68, 70-71; © 2012 Civic Research Institute, Kingston NJ, www.civicresearchinstitute.com/opr.html    



Keywords: Community Options for Youth, COY, crossover youth, Emily Luhrs, social services, youth

Posted in Blog, Juvenile Justice

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