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News and publications from past 90 days

CJCJ in the news: Native Lives Matter, Too

The New York Times tracts the disparate killings of Native Americans by police officers, citing CJCJ as one of the few sources that covered this issue. 

September news from CJCJ: Executive Director publishes history of California juvenile justice system

After the Doors Were Locked: California's juvenile justice history; JJS supports youth on Polynesia Violence Prevention Day; CJCJ participates in Monterey County Proposition 47 town hall

Why has crime plummeted?

Does the stunning increase in educational achievement among young people over the last 20 years explain why nearly every “adolescent risk” (homicide, drug abuse, and violent death) has plummeted to record-low levels?

CJCJ in the news: The Push to Imprison California's Low-Level Offenders

As critics fault Proposition 47 for a spike in crime—which reduced some minor offenses from felonies to misdemeanors—the East Bay Express cites expert criminologists and CJCJ to explain why the claim is problematic. 

Monterey County residents discuss impact of Proposition 47

On September 10, local elected officials, community leaders, and neighbors in Monterey County’s City of Seaside gathered to learn about the impact of Proposition 47 on state policymaking and local public safety, 

CJCJ and San Francisco Training Partnership strive to provide a second chance

“When people get out of prison, they are being released into this chaotic city — a city that has greatly transformed in recent years — and it’s a fragile time,” says CJCJ's San Francisco Training Partnership case manager, Matthew Snope. 

Assembly Select Committee Hears from Youth of Color

Community groups, advocate organizations, and young people of color who compose the Alliance for Boys and Men of Color meet with legislators, discuss policy, and request that community leaders have input in decisions affecting their neighborhoods.

CJCJ in the news: With Juvenile Deincarceration, Jerry Miller Was First One Over the Wall

CJCJ's executive director, Daniel Macallair, is honored as a "feisty Miller acolyte" by the Chronicle of Social Change after the passing of the great Jerry Miller. 

August news from CJCJ

CJCJ clients gain leadership skills and enjoy the outdoors; Realignment and crime in 2014: California's violent crime in decline; Youth of color visit state representatives to discuss key legislation

Realignment and Crime in 2014: California's Violent Crime in Decline

A new report from CJCJ analyzes the increased Realigned population's effect on county crime and finds that there is no causal relationship. 

Enough Nonsense on Youthful (In)competence

Pre-judging the individual guilt of the Santa Cruz 15-year-old accused of murdering a child is not just, and judging all 15-year-olds as incompetent is not science. 

CJCJ’s Sentencing Service Program keeps youth in juvenile court

When a prosecutor wants to try a youth as an adult, defense attorneys reach out to Nisha Ajmani, program manager for CJCJ’s Sentencing Service Program (SSP), to keep that youth in the juvenile justice system.

CJCJ Founder Passes On

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Jerome G. Miller, the visionary leader who closed Massachusetts’s juvenile prisons in the early 1970s and forever changed the context of juvenile justice reform. 

CJCJ in the news: As California becomes more diverse, youth arrests continue to plummet

Sacramento News & Review interviews CJCJ's Mike Males on his report "The Plummeting Arrest Rates of California's Children" detailing the dramatic decline in youth arrests over the past 30 years.

California Court Rules Proposition 47 Applies to Youth

This July, California’s Fourth District Court of Appeal held that a San Diego youth was eligible to reclassify his sentence from a felony to misdemeanor under California’s Proposition 47, setting a legal precedent for the rest of the state. 

CJCJ in the news: Treating Broken Hearts With Poor Mental Health Services

Juvenile Justice Information Exchange (JJIE) publishes an op-ed by CJCJ's Lauren Barretto on the lack of adequate screening for, and evaluation of, mental health needs in the juvenile justice system.

July news from CJCJ

CJCJ welcomes Cameo House's new director, Shirley Lamarr; Men's Wearhouse donates suits to CJCJ program graduates; Nisha Ajmani calls for trauma-informed care in the juvenile system

Obama blames “teenagers doing stupid things” for drugs, crime, imprisonment

 We need a modern strategy that treats crime as a behavior of individuals, not demographic groups, and a criminal justice system that responds to individual characteristics. These four charts show game-changing trends in drug abuse, arrest, and imprisonment the president and major interests steadfastly ignore.

CJCJ in the news: Protesters question Denver police killing of mentally ill Native American

After Denver police shot and killed Paul Castaway, a Rosebud Sioux tribal citizen, Al Jazeera America contacted CJCJ's Mike Males to discuss his data on which demographics are most likely to be shot by police. 

California crime keeps going down in 2014

This month, the Attorney General of California released new data for 2014 showing that crime in the state continued its downward trend.

CJCJ in the news: San Francisco should fund effective programs, not a new jail

San Francisco County Supervisor, Jane Kim, highlights CJCJ's Cameo House as a model alternative to incarceration for rest of the nation. 

CJCJ in the news: Why Bill Clinton admitted being wrong on crime

CJCJ's Mike Males is featured as a guest on the Huffington Post Live's discussion about the Clinton admnistration's effect on crime and what the change in public opinion means for Hilary Clinton's campaign. 

California Stentencing Institute screenshot

California Sentencing
Institute (CASI)

Explore how California’s 58 counties send their residents to correctional institutions with interactive maps, charts, and downloadable data.

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