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OP-ED: A New Year and New Opportunity for Policy Reform in California

CJCJ's Policy Analyst, Brian Goldstein, discusses California's public policy priorities in 2014.

A New Year and New Opportunity for Policy Reform in California

In 2014, community advocates and state policymakers should work together to continue focus on three policy areas and develop solutions that reflect the experiences of California’s most vulnerable populations.

The state of disproportionate minority contact: San Francisco & beyond
The execution of justice is not always neutral.  Unfortunately, racial discrimination remains deeply imbedded in the policies and practices of the justice system, and not merely a relic of the past.  For example, minority youth are disproportionately affected with higher arrest and confinement rates than White youth.  Experts identify this phenomenon as Disproportionate Minority Contact/Confinement (DMC).  This is a widely recognized problem, one already given considerable attention by law…
San Francisco's Arrest Rates of African Americans for Drug Felonies Worsens
San Francisco's Arrest Rates of African Americans for Drug Felonies Worsens
Targeting Blacks for Marijuana - Possession Arrests of African Americans in California, 2004-08
Targeting Blacks for Marijuana - Possession Arrests of African Americans in California, 2004-08 The Drug Policy Alliance, June 30, 2010
The racism of marijuana prohibition
The racism of marijuana prohibition Los Angeles Times, September 7, 2009
The Trouble with Disproportionate Minority Confinement
Recent reports by the W. Haywood Burns Institute and NAACP deploring disproportionate minority confinement in juvenile facilities raise an important ongoing issue. It is true, as the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice's own investigations agree, that black and brown youth receive increasingly harsh treatment as they move from arrest through sentencing stages that the juvenile justice system must address. But there's another troubling issue. A key CJCJ mission has been to reduce the use of…
Juvenile Detention in San Francisco: Analysis and Trends 2006
Juvenile Detention in San Francisco: Analysis and Trends 2006
San Francisco Challenges: Statistics don't support official explanations for high black arrest rate

San Francisco Challenges: Statistics don't support official explanations for high black arrest rate San Francisco Chronicle, March 19, 2007

San Francisco's High African American Arrest Rate: Sorting through the data to expose the facts
San Francisco's High African American Arrest Rate: Sorting through the data to expose the facts
Slavery in the Third Millennium
Slavery in the Third Millennium
Reducing Disproportionate Minority Confinement: The Multnomah County Oregon Success Story and its Implications
Reducing Disproportionate Minority Confinement: The Multnomah County Oregon Success Story and its Implications
Texas Tough? An Analysis of Incarceration and Crime Trends in The Lone Star State
Texas Tough? An Analysis of Incarceration and Crime Trends in The Lone Star State
Poor Prescription: The Costs of Imprisoning Drug Offenders in the United States
Poor Prescription: The Costs of Imprisoning Drug Offenders in the United States
The Color of Justice
The Color of Justice
The Punishing Decade: Prison and Jail Estimates at the Millennium
The Punishing Decade: Prison and Jail Estimates at the Millennium
From Classrooms to Cell Blocks: How Prison Building Affects Higher Education & African American Enrollment in CA
From Classrooms to Cell Blocks: How Prison Building Affects Higher Education & African American Enrollment in CA

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