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News items related to Juvenile justice

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January Newsletter: Proposed Ballot Initiative to Repeal Direct File

CJCJ offers a new free resource for youth, KQED's Forum interviews CJCJ Executive Director Daniel Macallair and Governor Brown announces new ballot initiative to repeal direct file.

CJCJ in the news: U.S. Supreme Court, Life Sentences for Juveniles Must Be Reviewed

Public News Service interviews CJCJ's executive director, Daniel Macallair, on the significance of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent juvenile justice decision. 

CJCJ in the news: Court Decision Brings Hope, Uncertainty for Juveniles Sentenced to Life

JJIE quotes CJCJ's Daniel Macallair on today's Supreme Court decision to retroactively extend a a 2012 verdict ruling juvenile life without parole (JLWOP) as unconstitutional. 

Proposition 47 Savings: Reinvest in California’s Communities
The BSCC will be hosting  four community meetings in southern California, providing an opportunity for advocates to voice their opinions about how Proposition 47 funding should be used. 
JJIE: Juvenile Justice Can Be Reformed Without Invoking Old Prejudices

Individualized justice, economic equality and factual accuracy should supply the science driving reform, not century-old biodeterminism.

CJCJ in the news: Dear America, Time to Open the Bank of Justice

Houston's Forward Times cites a CJCJ report showing the many different ways African American youth are disproportionately represented in both the juvenile and criminal justice systems nationwide. 

KQED Forum Interviews Daniel Macallair

KQED Forum's Michael Montgomery talks with CJCJ executive director, Daniel Macallair, about his new book, the history of youth corrections in California, and the lessons to be learned from the past.  

End Mass Incarceration. Stop Prosecuting Youth as Adults.

Youth tried as adults generally experience worse outcomes and higher rates of incarceration than their juvenile court counterparts.By ending the transfer of young people to adult court and harnessing the strengths of the juvenile justice system, we can improve the lives of at-risk youth, their families, and our communities.

October news from CJCJ

JCRT's Daniel Reyes promotes community-based services at national conference,  a CJCJ youth client looks forward to the future, and After the Doors Were Locked by Daniel Macallair receives praise from criminal justice professionals

CJCJ in the news: KCBS interviews Daniel Macallair on sentencing youth to life without parole

On October 13th, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments to determine if its 2012 decision, prohibiting automatic sentencing of juveniles to life in prison without the possibility of parole, should be applied retroactively. 

September news from CJCJ: Executive Director publishes history of California juvenile justice system

After the Doors Were Locked: California's juvenile justice history; JJS supports youth on Polynesia Violence Prevention Day; CJCJ participates in Monterey County Proposition 47 town hall

Enough Nonsense on Youthful (In)competence

Pre-judging the individual guilt of the Santa Cruz 15-year-old accused of murdering a child is not just, and judging all 15-year-olds as incompetent is not science. 

CJCJ’s Sentencing Service Program keeps youth in juvenile court

When a prosecutor wants to try a youth as an adult, defense attorneys reach out to Nisha Ajmani, program manager for CJCJ’s Sentencing Service Program (SSP), to keep that youth in the juvenile justice system.

CJCJ in the news: As California becomes more diverse, youth arrests continue to plummet

Sacramento News & Review interviews CJCJ's Mike Males on his report "The Plummeting Arrest Rates of California's Children" detailing the dramatic decline in youth arrests over the past 30 years.

California Court Rules Proposition 47 Applies to Youth

This July, California’s Fourth District Court of Appeal held that a San Diego youth was eligible to reclassify his sentence from a felony to misdemeanor under California’s Proposition 47, setting a legal precedent for the rest of the state. 

CJCJ in the news: Treating Broken Hearts With Poor Mental Health Services

Juvenile Justice Information Exchange (JJIE) publishes an op-ed by CJCJ's Lauren Barretto on the lack of adequate screening for, and evaluation of, mental health needs in the juvenile justice system.

July news from CJCJ

CJCJ welcomes Cameo House's new director, Shirley Lamarr; Men's Wearhouse donates suits to CJCJ program graduates; Nisha Ajmani calls for trauma-informed care in the juvenile system

CJCJ in the news: Like Our Vets, Justice-Involved Youth Are Survivors of War

Juvenile Justice Information Exchange (JJIE) publishes an op-ed written by CJCJ's Nisha Ajmani. 

Like Our Veterans, Justice-Involved Youth are Survivors of Traumatic Violence

Veterans and youth in the justice system have something in common—trauma. California’s juvenile courts should address this trauma through treatment, not incarceration.

For males of color, status is mixed

The Californian covers CJCJ's Brian Goldstein's testimony on the status of boys and men of color in Monterey County. 

May news from CJCJ

The plummeting arrest rates of California's children; Patti Lee honored as a trailblazer of juvenile justice reform; and California leaders work to implement Prop 47.

The Plummeting Arrest Rates of California's Children

A dramatic development with profound implications for Califorina's criminal justice system has occured over the last three decades: an enormous decline in arrests among the youngest Californians.

Why Do We Resist Individualized Justice?

“Demographic determinism” persists even among progressives. It needs to stop.

Former justice-involved youth should be key players in creating policy

Policymakers, law-enforcement, and advocates must include justice-involved youth when making decisions that affect these young people and their communities.

CJCJ in the news: It’s Poverty, Not the 'Teenage Brain,' That Causes the Most Youth Crime

Pacific Standard Magazine highlights research by CJCJ's Mike Males on the role of poverty in causing youth crime.

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California Sentencing
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Explore how California’s 58 counties send their residents to correctional institutions with interactive maps, charts, and downloadable data.

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