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News items related to San Francisco

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Crime and Violence by San Francisco Youth Plunges 80 percent in Last 20 Years

But strangely, youth entering the system are twice as likely to be incarcerated today.

A Special Goodbye

Ten-year-old Eva was sad and upset — after six years of visiting her dad weekly in jail, everything was changing. Her father was going to prison.

National Reentry Week & April News from CJCJ

CJCJ'S Direct service team reflects on National Reentry Wee , San Francisco leadership discusses Prop. 47's impact on crime, & CJCJ advocates for community opportunity at the state Senate.

CJCJ's Matt Snope presents on unemployment after incarceration

The San Francisco Training Partnership case manager highlights employment needs of formerly incarcerated people.

CJCJ in the news: How Mario Woods Stands in for Vanishing Black San Francisco

The National Journal highlights a CJCJ report on San Francisco's disproportionate arrest rates of African-American women. 

Donate Toys and Games to the Children's Waiting Rooms

CJCJ's Children's Waiting Rooms provide a safe and fun environment for children while their parents tend to court business. Donate toys and games to the waiting rooms to help children learn and play. 

June news from CJCJ

Advocates voice concerns with $500 million for facility construction; San Francisco County holds hearing on bias in the justice system; CJCJ adult client gives back.

CJCJ in the news: The over-policing of black women in SF

San Francisco Public Defender, Jeff Adachi, discusses CJCJ's recent report on the city's disproportionate arrests of African American women. 

CJCJ in the news: S.F. police scandal focuses on dwindling number of blacks

The Los Angeles Times highlights CJCJ's 2012 report on San Francisco's disproportionate arrests of African Americans for drug felonies.

San Francisco's Disproportionate Arrest Rates of African American Women Persist

new CJCJ fact sheet analyzing data shows the disproportionately high arrest rates of African American women in San Francisco.

Cameo House: A Partnership to Help Mothers Succeed

In partnership with the San Francisco Adult Probation Department, CJCJ's Cameo House now serves as an alternative sentencing program for pregnant and parenting women in San Francisco County.

Violence Prevention has a New Champion

After seven amazing years of dedicated work, Kate McCracken, CJCJ’s Director of Policy and Development, will be moving her efforts into a specific violence prevention role as a Senior Planner and Policy Analyst with the San Francisco Mayor’s Office.

San Francisco’s Sheriff implements Obamacare

Sheriff Mirkarimi discusses his plans to implement the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in San Francisco.

Back to work: San Francisco reduces unfair barriers to employment

Earlier this month, San Francisco Board of Supervisors unanimously voted to implement a Fair Chance Ordinance promoting fair hiring policies among both public and private employers. 

A day in the life of Patsy Jackson a NoVA Case Manager

Patsy Jackson has been a case manager with NoVA for two years. Patsy helps her clients succeed by minimizing barriers to reentry and facilitating reintegration in their families and communities.

Contribute to a safe and healthy home today!

Help us provide a vital safety net for homeless mothers at Cameo House.

CJCJ pays tribute to the history of its new mentoring program

CJCJ's newest direct service program, the Youth Justice Mentoring Program, has a long history in San Francisco. CJCJ pays tribute to that legacy by carrying on these essential services.

Is there an end in sight to the War on Drugs?

As so many drug-related reforms move forward, there is still a need for a comprehensive examination of how drug policy is implemented locally.

CJCJ Newsletter - Introducing our new mentoring program!

This month CJCJ began providing mentoring services to youth in detention, and staff visited innovative post-Realignment programs in San Francisco and published an op-ed on SB 260.

SF Commission Explores What Works: Examining a Collaborative Diversion Program

Local model practices exist throughout the nation and there is substantial empirical research available to interested parties who seek to re-think their approach to juvenile and criminal justice. Justice leaders do not need to reinvent the wheel, but learn from others who have boldly risked a different approach within their local jurisdiction.

San Francisco’s reentry pod prepares people for successful release

San Francisco's unique reentry pod in Jail #2 serves men returning from state prison, prior to and during their release into the community. 

SF department website connects community to needed resources

San Francisco's Department of Children, Youth and their Families (DCYF) collaborates with local organizations to improve the lives of youth and their families.

Racial disparities in arrest practices merit closer attention

Nationally, African Americans are 4 times more likely to be arrested for marijuana use than their white counterparts, despite using the drug at approximately the same rate, according to a new report. 

Racial gap in pot busts extends to SF

In San Francisco, a city that prides itself on a progressive attitude toward marijuana, authorities have been arresting fewer and fewer people for pot possession. But African Americans are arrested at far higher rates than whites.

Up Front

Senior Research Fellow, Mike Males, discusses Realignment's impact on county-by-county disparities.

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